TRASHED starring Jeremy Irons

$49.00$250.00

EDUCATIONAL DIGITAL DOWNLOAD: For self-hosted school servers $475 (download above, includes caption file).
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360x270_community-screening-package Jeremy Irons sets out to discover the extent and effects of the global waste problem, as he travels around the world to beautiful destinations tainted by pollution. This is a meticulous, brave investigative journey that takes Irons (and us) from scepticism to sorrow and from horror to hope. Irons showcases the individuals, activists, corporate and advocacy groups around the world who are working to affect change and reform the current model.

 

$49 special pricing for Recycling Coordinators to use for outreach programs.

DVDs
Universities, Businesses (includes Public Performance Rights) $250
K-12 Schools (includes PPRs) $129
Public Libraries (includes PPRs) $69
Government Agencies/Recycling Coordinators  $49

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Description

trashed_ironsJeremy Irons sets out to discover the extent and effects of the global waste problem, as he travels around the world to beautiful destinations tainted by pollution. This is a meticulous, brave investigative journey that takes Irons (and us) from skepticism to sorrow and from horror to hope. Irons showcases the individuals, activists, corporate and advocacy groups around the world who are working to affect change and reform the current model.

97 mins. on DVD

2013

Produced by Blenheim Films

67 min DIGITAL FILE available as 848×480 MP4 download. See Pricing Options

Additional information

Weight 0.32 lbs
Dimensions 9 x 6 x 0.5 in
Pricing Options

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Reviews

  1. Trashed – No Place For Waste with the participation of Jeremy Irons, looks at the risks to the food chain and the environment through pollution of our air, land and sea by waste. The film reveals surprising truths about very immediate and potent dangers to our health. It is a global conversation from Iceland to Indonesia between the film star Jeremy Irons and scientists, politicians and ordinary i ndividuals whose health and livelihoods have been fundamentally affected by waste pollution. Visually and emotionally the film is both horrific and beautiful: an interplay of human interest and political wake-up call. But it ends on a message of hope: showing how the risks to our survival can easily be averted through sustainable approaches that provide far more employment than the current ‘waste industry’.

    Crucial viewing for realists and alarmists both.
    Joe Neumaier
    New York Daily News

    This eye-opening and educational documentary about the shocking and brutal effects of our global waste problem will make you sit up, listen, and reconsider your lifestyle and diet choices.
    Jennifer Tate
    ViewLondon

  2. SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL starred review
    May 21, 2014
    by Eva Elisabeth VonAncken, formerly of Trinity-Pawling School Library, Pawling, NY

    Actor Jeremy Irons Exposes Earths Pollution in Eco Doc ‘Trashed’ | DVD Pick

    97 min. Dist. by Green Planet Films. 2013. Schools $129, public libraries $69.

    Gr 7-12–

    In this grim and shocking eco-documentary, actor Jeremy Irons travels the world investigating the monumental waste produced by our consumer-oriented lifestyles. Irons—calm, sometimes concerned, but with touches of lightness—is well suited presenting the harsh facts he offers. Some of the aftereffects of rampant waste are trash mountains seeping toxic waste into the Mediterranean, dying turtles and barren whales, plastic debris polluting the oceans, children with birth defects, undrinkable milk, and unbreathable air. Divided into four parts covering land, air, water, and then solutions, this eye-opening examination offers a glimmer of hope if only because some basic recycling strategies are seriously proposed and seen enforced. It doesn’t have to end badly for the Earth, suggests the film, but the time to act is now. Enhanced by an interesting, if somewhat downbeat, score; excellent photography; and insightful interviews, this work should be compulsory viewing for both students and adults.

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