The Worm Hunters

$28.00$89.00

In a Turkish headquarters the world’s top earthworm scientists concoct a plan to find and name their ultimate discovery. Nothing will stop them as they travel to all corners of the world with spades, GPS worm locators and secret worm outing fluids to unearth their prize. But love turns savage when things don’t go to plan and the worm gets the upper hand. An epic adventure into an underground science and an unstoppable passion.

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Description

In a Turkish headquarters the world’s top earthworm scientists concoct a plan to find and name their ultimate discovery. Nothing will stop them as they travel to all corners of the world with spades, GPS worm locators and secret worm outing fluids to unearth their prize. But love turns savage when things don’t go to plan and the worm gets the upper hand. An epic adventure into an underground science and an unstoppable passion.

In a dark underworld of dirty deeds, vile slime and deadly pollution, scientists are exposing an animal that could help save our challenged planet – the humble earthworm. So what can it tell us about earth’s geographic evolution? Can it reverse the earth’s infertile hot spots? Can it really cure cancer? Is it the answer to toxic waste? In 2009/2010 The Worm Hunters go underground to find answers. Armed with spades, GPS worm locators, secret ‘worm ousting’ fluids, back-hoes and worm evacuators our somewhat oddball, but dedicated, scientists literally search ‘high and low’ for the world’s first Super Worm.

52 mins
2011

Produced by Gulliver Media
Directed by Randall Wood
Post Production by Fifty Fifty Films
Editor – Scott Walton
Animation Director /Colorist – Paul Butler
Animator – Andres Gomez Isaza

“The Worm Hunters,” collected the Special Jury Award at the 2011 Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival, one of the World’s premier wildlife film festivals and market. Over 500 docos from 30 countries were entered in this prestigious 5 day long event.

Additional information

Weight 0.32 lbs
Dimensions 9 × 6 × 0.5 in
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Reviews

  1. staffadmin

    Randall Wood’s documentary goes underground – literally – in search of the earthworms. The film presents a globetrotting research a group of taxonomists who are billed as the “world’s top earthworm scientists,” and these folks take their worm hunts very seriously. And for one expert in South Africa, the earthworm hunt flirts with grave danger: the scientist goes into the wild and vigorously uproots soil with a shovel while rifle-bearing hunters form a protective circle to ward off predatory creatures.

    But, ultimately, it might be worthwhile: there are 6,000 known species of earthworms, and perhaps several thousand that have yet to be identified, and science has only recently been able to successful plumb the earthworm’s positive impact on the global ecosystem. However, time might not be on the earthworm’s side: reckless commercial over-development, which has already created environmental disasters around the world, threatens to imperil the survival of many earthworm species.

    It is all very compelling, and Wood presents the information in a user-friendly manner that can be easily understood by those who are unfamiliar with the ecological sciences involved in this story. If there is a downside, it would be the relentlessly cheery on-camera narration by British taxonomist Emma Sherlock – while her enthusiasm might be sincere, her excessive joviality becomes a bit wearisome.

    Nonetheless, the enigmatic earthworms and their indefatigable human advocates manage to keep the film’s focus in place.
    FILM THREAT

    ======

    Documentary maker unearths new approaches
    [Fri 02/08/2013 04:05:50]

    By Don Groves

    When Randall Wood commissioned the music for his most recent documentary, he asked composer Brett Alpin to create a score that would suit a James Bond adventure.

    A 007-type theme was a highly unusual choice considering the subject: the quest by some of the world’s top earthworm scientists to find rare species.

    Wood will show his docu, The Worm Hunters, and explain his unconventional approach to filmmaking at the next session of the Australian Documentary Forum at AFTRS on August 14.

    Produced by Gulliver Media and financed by National Geographic and the European networks ZDF and ARTE, the film won prizes at numerous festivals including Wildscreen, the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival, St Petersburg Science Film Festival in Russia, Greenscreen in Germany and the US’s International Wildlife Film Festival.

    Ozdox’ Martha Ansara says Wood’s work “challenges the conventional, ‘respectable’ notions of documentary form,” with animated graphics, fast cutting, layered editing and multi-character stories.

    Wood relishes that reputation, telling IF, “Who wouldn’t want to challenge descriptions such as ‘conventional’ or ‘respectable’? To make a film about earthworms and those who obsessively love them was always going to be a challenge.

    “If worms had fur, big teeth and were aggressive predators of humans, the film would have been easy to pitch and make. So how to make a film about slimy, unseen, unloved worms and the science of soil and imbue it with drama, humour and cinematic festival potential? For me it came down to one thing – character development.

    “Studying feature writing and directing at Binger Film Lab in Amsterdam taught me to place character development at the core of a film. But rather than develop the worm film as an easy single character narrative I chose a multi-character structure after watching Michael Winterbottom’s 1999 film Wonderland.

    “Juggling multiple character stories is much harder in terms of structure but energises the narrative and allows for multi-faceted entry points to the exploration of theme. So I travelled to international earthworm taxonomy conferences in Romania, Poland, London and Turkey to cast a pose of obsessed worm scientists. These scientists and their journeys become core to the story and structure of The Worm Hunters.”

    He got the idea for the Bond-like score after interviewing a woman who fled Poland years ago after being interrogated by the Polish equivalent of the KGB and moved to South Africa, where she assembled one of the world’s largest collections of earthworms: roughly 50,000.

    Unusually, the writer-director started out by asking Alpin to compose drafts of the score, to which he cut the film initially, before they got together for the final mix and cut.

    Wood sees the project primarily as a “human story about how obsession can take over peoples’ lives.” On another level it’s about ecology, taxonomy and solving the Earth’s need to feed its citizens.

    if.com.au

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