Terra Antarctica: ReDiscovering the Seventh Continent

$59.00$149.00

This National Geographic-sponsored exploration is a one-of-a-kind look at Antarctica from a unique perspective – sea level. Impacted by climate change – temperatures have warmed along the Peninsula faster than anywhere on the planet during the past 50 years – this part of Antarctica is also experiencing a boom in tourism and nations fighting over who owns what as its ice slowly disappears.

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Description

For six weeks we explored the Antarctic Peninsula by sea kayak, sailboat, foot and small plane, observing the fast changing evolution of this most remote place. Impacted by climate change – temperatures have warmed along the Peninsula faster than anywhere on the planet during the past 50 years – this part of Antarctica is also experiencing a boom in tourism and nations fighting over who owns what as its ice slowly disappears. This National Geographic-sponsored exploration is a one-of-a-kind look at Antarctica from a unique perspective – sea level.

Written and Directed by Jon Bowermaster

Oceans8 Films
www.jonbowermaster.com

Format: Color, DVD-Video, NTSC
Language: English
Region: All Regions
Number of Discs: 1
Rating: Not Rated
DVD Release Date: Nov 25, 2009

Run Time: 48 minutes

Additional information

Weight 0.32 lbs
Dimensions 9 x 6 x 0.5 in
Pricing Options

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Reviews

  1. “Editor’s Choice. An excellent, up-to-date documentary film about the continent of Antarctica. Current issues facing Antarctica, particularly the impact of global warming, are discussed and illustrated. One of the strengths of this documentary is that it doesn’t lecture the audience with scientific facts – it simply shows you what is happening in Antarctica and what scientists think the consequences will be, which makes the point much better.”
    – Science Books and Films (AAAS)

    “The award-winning cinematography of the rugged yet fragile landscape, its wildlife, and particularly the ice, really tells the story. The narrative adds just enough to establish the value of that ice to the continent, its wildlife, and the surrounding oceans. We may never see Antarctica look quite this way again.”
    -Green Teacher

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