SCRAPHOUSE: San Francisco

$19.95$139.00

ScrapHouse was a temporary demonstration home, built entirely of salvaged material on Civic Center Plaza adjacent to San Francisco City Hall. Over the course of just six weeks, a team of volunteers scoured Bay Area dumps and scrap yards. A group of architects, landscape architects, lighting specialists, and metal fabricators repurposed the materials, giving them new life. ScrapHouse illustrated the possibilities
DVD: Colleges/Universities, Gov’t, Businesses
(includes Public Performance Rights) $139

DVD: K-12 Schools / Public Libraries/Home Video $19.95
Clear

Description

ScrapHouse was a temporary demonstration home, built entirely of salvaged material on Civic Center Plaza adjacent to San Francisco City Hall.
Challenge 1: Design
Rethinking a standard single-family home floor plan, the ScrapHouse Design Team generated an elegant design solution, inspired by the abundance of scrap material. Every material, from the foundation to the front door, was reclaimed and re-used.
Challenge 2: Search
Finding appropriate innovative materials was the next challenge. The team spent three weeks scouring the Bay Area for building materials, furnishings and finishes; purchasing new only hardware and fasteners. Some salvaged materials were re-used for their intended purpose, while others were reincarnated in unusual ways.
Challenge 3: Build
The ScrapHouse team’s final challenge was a two-week blitz build, kicking off the last week of May and concluding with the public opening of the house itself on June 2, 2005.
With walls sheathed with everything from street signs and shower doors, ScrapHouse drew tens of thousands of passersby. ScrapHouse illustrated the possibilities—as well as the challenges—of green building, recycling, and reuse.
Over the course of just six weeks, a team of volunteers scoured Bay Area dumps and scrap yards. A group of architects, landscape architects, lighting specialists, and metal fabricators repurposed the materials, giving them new life. Solid core doors recovered from a school construction project became an interesting floor material. Outdated phone books became a wonderfully textured insulating wall. Retired firehoses from the San Francisco Fire Department were deployed as wall paneling, dramatically transforming a double height living space.
And when it was all said and done, “scrap” had taken on a whole new meaning.
Scraphouse: San Francisco was conceived by Anna Fitch and Chicken John
Directed by Anna Fitch
Produced by Winton / duPont (www.wdfilms.com) films
44 minutes
NTSC
All Regions
The ScrapHouse was designed by Public Architecture

Additional information

Weight 0.32 lbs
Dimensions 9 x 6 x 0.5 in
Pricing Options

, ,

Reviews

  1. Reviewed for Educational Media Reviews Online by Winifred Fordham Metz, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Recommended

    Americans build more than 24 million new homes each year. They also tear down approximately 200,000 buildings, annually. This generates around 100 billion pounds of trash. The question posed in this film is, “Can one person’s trash become another person’s house?” One man – San Francisco’s Chief Building inspector Laurence Kornfield –thinks so. OK, actually four men think so (accompanying Kornfield are architect John Peterson, salvage guru “Flash,” and structural engineer Pat Buscovich) – and one woman documented it. Director Anna Fitch brings a fast-paced, energetic, journalistic approach to this documentary about an incredible building challenge and the team of artists, engineers, and builders who make it happen.

    Charged with creating a safe, stable, stylish house made entirely from salvaged supplies (all building materials with the exception of the nails and screws must come from scavenged, reclaimed, or recycled goods, free of charge), the team has one month to design and build ScrapHouse on the lawn of San Francisco’s city hall in time for the 2005 UN World Environment Day celebration.

    The design team, engineer and building inspector get to work quickly, drawing up plans and testing the viability of each scrap of material’s intended use. But two weeks in, it seems like the project risks being scrapped due to lack of a general contractor (essential to making the 2D plans a 3D reality). Presumably just in time, kind young contractor—John Pollard—scraps his two week vacation and rides to the work-site-rescue in his mini cooper. With the team complete, the project moves full steam ahead.

    Barring a handful of interpersonal skirmishes between the architect(s), contractor, and builders (an interesting comment on the work-force divide) and minor bumps in the scavenging of usable materials, the project proceeds relatively smoothly. Much of the success of this documentary is due to Fitch’s on point direction and script as well as Grochowski’s tight editing. The lively soundtrack and deft narration by Nick Shatzky deserve mention, and help make this an enjoyable viewing exercise.

    This film would find good use in classes dealing with art and architecture, sustainability, city & regional planning, and similar issues related to environmental or urban studies.

Add a review